Italy Travel

Italy is one of those countries everyone knows and talks about. One of the reason is it’s boot shape structure, the other is it’s history.

Two good reasons to travel there and see all the wonderful sites.

Italian is the official language of Italy; spoken by the vast majority of people.

While each region has its own dialect, Tuscan, the dialect of Tuscany, is the standard dialect for Italian.

French is also spoken in parts of Piedmonte and in Valle d’Aosta, where it has become the second official language of the region.

Slovene is spoken in the Trieste-Gorizia area, and German is widely used in Bolzano Province.

One can say that Italy then has a greater linguistic spectrum than given credit for.

The presence of the Vatican in it’s  region has given Italy (Italien) a strong religious identity world wide.
Roman Catholicism, is affirmed as the state religion under the Lateran Treaty of 1929.

Italy’s highway system is considered, one of the world’s best, in 2002 totaled 479,688 km (298,366 mi).

These expressways route Milan-Como-Varese, Venice-Padua, Naples-Salerno, and Milan-Bologna-Florence-Rome-Naples. All great places to visit.

A major highway runs through the Mont Blanc Tunnel, connecting France and Italy.

The Italian patrimony, based on Roman antecedents is the oldest in Europe over 2,500 years old.

The earliest known inhabitants of Italy were the Ligurians, Sabines, and Umbrians, in the 9th century bc they were largely displaced in central Italy by the Etruscans, a seafaring people, probably from Asia Minor.

Southern Italy and Sicily were conquered shortly after by the Phoenicians and the Greeks.

By 650 bc, Italy was divided  into ethnic areas: the Umbrians in the north, the Ligurians in the northwest.

The Latins and Etruscans in the central regions, and the Greeks and Phoenicians in the south and Sicily.

By 350 bc, after a series of wars with both Greeks and Etruscans, the Latins, with Rome as their capital, gained the ascendancy.

By 272 bc, they managed to unite the entire Italian peninsula.

From its inception, Rome was a republican city-state.

Four famous civil conflicts destroyed the republic:

  • Sulla against Marius and his son (88–82 bc).
  • Julius Caesar against Pompey (49–45 bc).
  • Brutus and Cassius against Mark Antony and Octavian (43 bc), and Mark Antony against Octavian.
  • Octavian, the final victor (31 bc), was accorded the title of Augustus (“exalted”) by the Senate and thereby became the first Roman emperor.

Under imperial rule, Rome undertook a series of conquests that brought Roman law, Roman administration, and Pax Romana (“Roman peace”) to an area extending from the Atlantic to the Rhine, to the British Isles, to the Iberian Peninsula and large parts of North Africa, and to the Middle East as far as the Euphrates.

The word Italia (Italy) appears on a coin dating back to the 1st century BC. Which was minted by the confederation of the Italic peoples who rose up against Rome.

The coin was found in the region of Abruzzo in Corfinio, the ancient Corinium, capital of the confederation with the name of Italica.

The long Roman domination dating from the 3rd century BC to the 5th century AD has left a mark in Italy with its roads, aqueducts, temples, monuments, towns and cities, bridges, and theatres.

Travel to Italy,  and see a past that can still be seen in every part of the country.