Israel Travel

Israel is a democratic country with a parliamentary system. The prime minister is head of government and the Knesset.

The Knesset is the name for the Israeli Parliament or Legislature.

Israel is a developed country and a OECD member.

In 2016, Israel was said to be the worlds 34th-largest economy.

The Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics, estimated that the population of Israel was close to 8,709,680.

Hebrew is not the only language spoken in Israel. Arabic is also an official language, and there are a number of other semi-official languages.

In Israel you will notice that virtually all official signs are in Hebrew, Arabic and English.

Israel is the world’s only Jewish-majority state, two thirds of the population is Jewish.

The other third is made up of Arabs, Arameans, Armenians, Assyrians, Black Hebrew Israelites, Circassians, Maronites and Samaritans.

In its Basic Laws, Israel defines itself as a Jewish Democratic State.

The country benefits from a highly skilled workforce and is among the most educated countries in the world.

Israel has a very high percentage of citizens with a high education degree.

The country also has the highest standard of living in the Middle East, and has one of the highest life expectancy in the world.

Israel is a beautiful small country with a interesting history, and advanced Agro Technologies.

Israel’s economy and technological center is Tel Aviv, while its seat of government and proclaimed capital is Jerusalem.

Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv is a major transportation city, with a huge international airport.

The public transportation system in Tel Aviv has many routes; to almost anywhere in the country.

Tel Aviv is governed by a 31-member city council; elected for a five-year term.

Tel Aviv is a cultural center with 544 active synagogues, historic buildings, countless performing art centers, theaters, and Opera Houses.

Tel Aviv is divided into nine districts.

In 1965 The Shalom Meir Tower, Israel’s first skyscraper, was built in Tel Aviv.

Tel Aviv is a center of finance and technology in Israel.

Jerusalem

Jerusalem is a city with a strong religious background, since medieval times.

Host to 1204 Synagogues, 158 Churches, and 73 Mosques.

In Islam, Jerusalem is said to be a sacred city – some 1400 years now. Jerusalem is believed to be a holy city in Islam, primarily due to Muhammad’s Night of Ascension.

The Muslims believe Muhammad was transported one night from Mecca to the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. From there he ascended to Heaven to meet with the previous prophets of Islam.

In Christianity, Jerusalem is said to be a sacred city – some 2000 years now.

In Judaism, Jerusalem is said to be sacred city – some 3000 years now.

Jerusalem is well known for its Old Testament history.

The story of Jesus in The New testament also made reference to Jerusalem.

Although Jerusalem is known primarily for its religious significance, the city is also home to many artistic and cultural venues.

The Dead Sea scrolls, discovered in the mid-20th century in the Qumran Caves near the Dead Sea, are housed in the Museum’s Shrine of the Book.

Jerusalem is home to many archaeological important findings.

Some of Jerusalem most interesting sites are:

The Museum on the Seam – explores issues of coexistence through art.
The Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra – established in the 1940s.
The International Convention Center – near the entrance to city.
The Jerusalem Cinemateque – in downtown Jerusalem.
The Jerusalem Music Center – in Yemin Moshe.
The Israel Festival – Indoor and outdoor performances singers, concerts, plays, and street theater.
The Jerusalem Theater – Hosts to more than 150 concerts a year, as well as theater and dance companies and performing artists from overseas.
The Khan Theater – The city’s only repertoire theater.

Israeli Beaches

There are 137 beaches in Israel. Mostly of which have crystal clear blue and turquoise waters and natural undisturbed coastlines.

Besides their natural beauty what makes these beaches interesting is that they are composed of diverse bodies of waters.

The four bodies of water are The Mediterranean, The Red Sea, The Dead Sea, and The Kinneret.

Here are some Israeli Beach recommendations:

Gordon Beach: Free clean beach in Tel Aviv near Hotels. Has places to dine or drink; shower and bathroom facilities.

Dor Nasholim Beach – Beautiful white sandy beaches with crystal clear blue waters in the ancient Phoenician city of Dor.

Habonim Beach – This beach is part of a nature reserve. A rocky beach perfect for swimming with young children.

You can also hike along it’s coastline and discover it’s caves.

Clean showers, dressing rooms, and bathrooms are available. There are also snack bars, and a picnicking area with tables.

Carmel Beach – Carmel beach has a boardwalk with numerous cafes, restaurants, and juice stands as well as bathroom and shower facilities.

Southern Beach – Entrance is free.

Ein Gev Resort Village Beach: Great for water sports, has slides and pools. They have lifeguard services, showers, restrooms, restaurant, camping area with barbecue stands.

Ein Gedi Beach – Located on the shores of the Dead Sea well known the amazing healing properties of the region.

The beach is connected to a man made spa. You can hike from the beach to the spa, or take a free tram ride to it.

It’s hard to sink in the Dead Sea, most people just float.

Dolphin Reef Beach – Great place to see Dolphins in their natural habitat.

Coral Beach Nature Reserve – Clear water with an underwater coral reef. Good for snorkeling, and scuba diving. A great place to enjoy coral reefs and beautiful fishes.

Israel rich history makes it a great place to take a tour. You can choose from what type of tour you want, whether is a cultural tour, or religious tours.

Either way it’s a great experience.

Israel is known for it’s fine hotel and restaurant meals.

Electricity in Israel is 230 Volts, alternating at 50 cycles per second.
If you travel to Israel with a device that does not accept 230 Volts at 50 Hertz, you will need a voltage converter.

Book now and have the time of your life, let me know about your trip.

Madrid Travel

Brief History of Madrid

Madrid is a great place to travel to,  it’s  history is full of interesting facts; here are a few of them.

Madrid is the capital of Spain since 1606. The development of Madrid as a city began when Philip II moved his court from Toledo to Madrid in 1560.

The origin of the name Madrid is believed to date back as far as 2nd century BC.

In 1329, Ferdinand IV of Castile assembled the Cortes Generales, a precursor to the modern Spanish parliament.

Between 1379 – 1406 Henry III of Castile rebuilt the city after it was destroyed by fire.

The marriage of Ferdinand and Isabella united the Crowns of Castile and Aragon, leading to the beginning of the Spain we all know and love today.

The two kingdoms maintained their national laws until 1714, when under the new Dynasty of the Bourboun a centralized State was built under the “Ways and Laws of Castile”.

The kingdoms of Castile and Aragón were fully united by Charles I of Spain.

During the 17th century, Madrid grew rapidly. The royal court attracted alot of artists and writers to Madrid among which are Cervantes and Lope de Vega.

Philip II transferred the capital from Toledo to Madrid in 1561.

In 1739 Philip V, began constructed new palaces, among which the Palacio Real de Madrid.

From 1716–1788 Charles III made Madrid a city full of buildings and monuments including the Prado and the Puerta de Alcalá.

In 1936–1939, Madrid was besieged by Spanish Nationalist and allied troops under Francisco Franco, during his dictatorship Madrid became very industrialized and experienced massive migrations from rural environments into the city.

Following the death of Franco, and in order to secure stability and democracy, the emerging democratic parties including those of left-wing and republican ideology accepted Franco’s wish to be succeeded by Juan Carlos I, leading to Spain’s current position as a constitutional monarchy.

Benefiting from prosperity in the 1980’s, Spain’s capital city has consolidated its position as the leading economic, cultural, industrial, educational and technological center of the Iberian peninsula.

The Monarchy of Spain referred to as the Crown or the Hispanic Monarchy comprises the reigning monarch, and of his or her family.

Spanish Constitution 

In 1978 the Spanish Constitution re-established the Spanish Monarchy as the form of government in Spain.

The present Spanish monarchy is represented by King Felipe VI, his wife Queen Letizia, and their daughters Leonor, Princess of Asturias, and Infanta Sofia.

It affirmed the role of the King of Spain as the personification and embodiment of the Spanish State and a symbol of Spain’s enduring unity and permanence.

In 2010, the budget for the Spanish monarchy was 7.4 million euros, one of the lowest public expenditures for the institution of monarchy in Europe.

Some of Madrid’s Most Popular Sites

Among Madrid’s most popular sites are the Museo Reina Sofia, Mercado de San Miguel, Temple de Debod, Plaza de Cibeles, Puerta del Sol, Gran Via, Retiro Park, Prado Museum, Plaza Mayor, and Palacio Real.

The Museo Reina Sofía was designed as a modern complement to the historical Prado Museum. The museum is home to a large collections of artwork by Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dalí.

The Mercado de San Miguel is a popular shopping destination for local foods and delicacies. On weekends it stays open as late as 2 a.m., as such it’s become a popular place to enjoy drinks and tapas.

The Temple of Debod is in Parque del Oeste, a park near the Royal Palace. The temple to the Egyptian goddess Isis; once stood on the banks of the Nile.

Plaza de Cibeles is closed to the Palace Cibeles, formerly known as the Palace of Communications. At the center of the plaza is a statue; the Fuente de la Cibeles. The fountain depicts the Roman goddess Cybele on a chariot drawn by lions.

Puerta del Sol, or the “Gate of the Sun,” is located in the center of Madrid. This is the place where thousands gather each New Year’s Eve to welcome in the new year. The statue of the Bear and the Strawberry Tree standing on one side of Puerta del Sol – is considered a symbol of Madrid.

The Gran Vía is known as the Broadway of Madrid because it’s “the street that never sleeps.” The Gran Vía has hundreds of shops, restaurants and businesses.

The Parque del Buen Retiro or El Retiro, is a 350-acre garden, with fountains located at the edge of the city center. Retiro Park was a monastery in the 1500s.

The Museo del Prado is an 18th century structure designed by Juan de Villanueva, which houses artworks from Goya, El Greco, da Ribera and Velázquez.

Madrid’s Plaza Mayor dates back to 1619, was used once to host bullfights.

The Palacio Real of Madrid is known for it’s huge structure, it has more than 2,500 fully decorated rooms. Built in 1764, the palace served as the royal residence of Carlos III.

The last royals to reside there were Alfonso XIII and Victoria Eugenie in the early 1900’s.

Fifty (50) of the rooms are open to the public, including the throne room (Salón del Trono),”.

The ceiling of the throne room was painted by the Baroque artist Tiepolo.

The palace is still used for official government ceremonies.

The palace also has a fresco in the grand dining hall that depicts Christopher Columbus presenting gifts from the New World to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella.

Travel Pass

When traveling to Madrid The Travel Pass is a wonderful way to save money when using Madrid’s public transport systems, the ticket is valid for all of Madrid’s Metro and Bus services within the city, together with the local suburban trains and the inner-city light railway.

The pass is available for 1, 2, 3, 5 or 7 days, and can be purchased for Zones A or T. Most of our visitors will require a pass for Zone A only, which covers all locations within Madrid’s city center including the airport.

The ticket is delivered in a protective plastic holder and includes Metro, bus and train maps, together with landmarks and places of interest in Madrid. Instructions for use are also included.

The pass must be purchased for the number of days you will use it for. It will then be activated the first time it is used, and the expiry date printed on the back.

The pass is then valid until 5:00 am on the day after the expiry date, allowing you to use the late nocturnal transport services as well.

In Madrid you can also buy a Tourist Pass and save big on top tourist attractions, some include transport and tapas at some of the sites.

In Madrid, electric power comes through at 220 volts and at 50 Hertz. Check to see if you will need a adapter.

Have a good time in Madrid, let me know about your true travel experience …

London Travel

A Brief History of London

London is a great place to travel to,  it’s  history is full of interesting facts; here are a few of them:

According to the legendary Historia Regum Britanniae, by Geoffrey of Monmouth, London was founded by Brutus of Troy about 1000–1100 B.C. after he defeated the native giant Gogmagog; the settlement was known as Caer Troia, Troia Nova in Latin it means New Troy.

AD 200

Britain was divided in two. York became the capital of Britannia Inferior & London of Britannia Superior.

A century later, the Emperor Diocletian reorganized Britain to improve administrative efficiency.

London became the capital of Maxima Caesariensis, one of the four newly created provinces.

It remained the financial center of Britain, and home of the treasury.

Christianity appears to have reached the province at an early date and, only a year after the religion became official London had its own Bishop, Restitutus. Who is known to have attended the Imperial Council of Arles.
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In 1097 William Rufus, the son of William the Conqueror began the construction of ‘Westminster Hall’, which became the focus of the Palace of Westminster.

In 1176 construction began of the most famous incarnation of London Bridge (completed in 1209) which was built on the site of several earlier wooden bridges.

This bridge would last for 600 years, and remained the only bridge across the River Thames until 1739.

In 1216 during the First Barons’ War London was occupied by Prince Louis of France, who had been called in by the baronial rebels against King John and was acclaimed as King of England in St Paul’s Cathedral.

Over the following centuries, London would shake off the heavy French cultural and linguistic influence which had been there since the times of the Norman conquest.

The city would figure heavily in the development of Early Modern English.

During the Reformation, more than half of the area of London was the property of monasteries. London was the center of Protestantism in England.

Henry VIII’s “Dissolution of the Monasteries” had a profound effect on the city. Most of the property changed hands.

The process started in the mid 1530s and by 1538 most monastic houses had been abolished.

The late 16th and early 17th century saw the great flourishing of drama in London. A iconic and prominent figure of the time was William Shakespeare.

During Queen Elizabeth I reign, some of her courtiers and wealthier citizens of London built themselves country residences in Middlesex, Essex and Surrey and permanently left the city.

This was an early stirring of the villa movement, which was a taste for residences which were neither of the city or on an agricultural estate, but at the time of Elizabeth’s death in 1603, London was densely populated.

The general meeting-place of the time was the Old St. Paul’s Cathedral. Merchants used to conduct their business in the aisles.

Lawyers received their clients at their particular pillars; and the unemployed went to the church to look for work.

St Paul’s Churchyard became the center of the book trade, while Fleet Street became a center of public entertainment.

Charles I, acceded to the throne in 1625. During his reign, aristocrats began to inhabit the West End in large numbers. On September 2nd of 1666 the Great Fire of London broke out at one o’clock in the morning at a bakery in Pudding Lane.

It was a windy night and the fire spread, for four days all efforts to extinguish it failed. On Thursday it was finally extinguished, but on the evening of that day the flames returned at the Temple. The fire destroyed sixty percent of the City, the Old St Paul’s Cathedral, 87 parish churches, 44 livery company halls and the Royal Exchange.

The number of lives lost was amazingly small; sixteen lives are said to have been lost in the blaze.

The new City was different from the old one. All the houses and structures were made of bricks. Wood houses were no longer allowed.

During the reign of Queen Anne an act was passed authorizing the building of 50 new churches to serve the greatly increased population living outside the boundaries of the City of London.

The 18th century was a period of rapid growth for London, reflecting an increasing national population, the early stirrings of the Industrial Revolution, and London’s role at the centre of the evolving British Empire.

The first railway to be built in London was a line from London Bridge to Greenwich, which opened in 1836.

In the mid-1960s, music was on the rise and the UK was noticed for such musicians as the Beatles and The Rolling Stones,

In the mid 60’s London also became a fashion trend – a household name of youth and fashion around the world.

London’s fame quickly spread when they introduced to the market thin built models in mini skirts and short dresses.

London became the home of models with thin build, androgynous looks, big eyes, long eyelashes, and very short hair – who wore mini skirts. Some with boots. It became a trend.

By 1966, the mini skirt phase put London on top of the Fashion world.


On 6 July 2005, London won the right to host the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics making it the first city to host the modern games three times.

However, celebrations were cut short the following day when the city was rocked by a series of terrorist attacks.

More than 50 were killed and 750 injured in three bombings on London Underground trains and a fourth on a double decker bus near King’s Cross.

As you can see London’s history is not only ancient, but intriguing. A must see place.

London Pass

When in London purchase the London Pass it provides you with discounts and free entry to over 60 of the very best tourist attractions in London. Plus a free hop-on hop-off bus tour.

There is also the London Pass for public transportation.

Some of the top attractions in London are the London Tower, Westminster Abbey, Windsor Castle, Kensington Palace, London Zoo and it’s always delightful take a boat cruise in the Thames River.

Make sure to check that your devices are compatible with the 220v voltage of London.

In order to use electronics from the United States in England, as well as most other countries outside of the American continent, you need a voltage converter and a plug adapter, unless you have dual-voltage electronics.

England is a country that uses 220v. If your visiting other countries in Europe as well they mostly uses 220v; as well.
NEW YORK – LONDON FLIGHT FROM $729 ROUND TRIP
Great Places to Visit in London 

Buckingham Palace  Tour – usually a 2.5-hour visit to Buckingham Palace to see the changing of the Guard Ceremony. Then, enjoy the State Rooms of Buckingham Palace.

Warner Bros. Studio Tour London – See the sets, costumes, and props used in all the Harry Potter films.

The Coca-Cola London Eye is a major feature of London’s skyline. It boasts some of London’s best views from its 32 capsules, each weighing 10 tonnes and holding up to 25 people. Climb aboard for a breathtaking experience, with an unforgettable perspective of more than 55 of London’s most famous landmarks – all in just 30 minutes!

Madame Tussaud Museum – See world’s most famous faces up-close from Shakespeare to recent artist.

London’s Hop on Hop Off  Bus – It’s best to buy a 24 hour ticket and enjoy the freedom to hop on and off the sightseeing buses and explore some of London’s most famous places, without having to rush to do it all in one day.

Visit the  Tower of London, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey, one day and St Paul’s Cathedral and Trafalgar Square the next day – plus all the stops you can make at restaurants, rivers, canals, parks and shopping streets.

The  Tower of London, is one of the world’s most famous buildings, its 900-year interesting history as a royal palace, prison and place of execution, arsenal, jewel house and zoo.

There is a 90 minute tour thru London’s dark past that is believed to knock your socks off.

The Sea Life London Aquarium houses over 400 species such as sharks, stingrays, moray eels, clown fish, and green turtles.

Getting around London on the River Boats  are popular with visitors and commuters alike, it’s a great way of beating the traffic and just sitting back to enjoy the view.

There is a large selection of these boat tours, some include, dinning, music, and dancing.

Among the canals a must see is the  Grand Union Canal The single longest canal in Britain, the Grand Union links London and Birmingham.

The River Thames London’s is a wonder ful place to see – runs almost 350km (220 miles) from source to sea. It has an amazing history and offers countless places to just sit and relax. It’s a leisure opportunity.

As you well know; there is so much more to see in London. I just hope you enjoyed the brief history offered here. I too like to know a litle bit about the places I visit.  Enjoy the videos and use the links to book your trip. Below is one for an electricity adaptar in case you need one.

London has great hotels, motels, car rentals and restaurants.

Don’t forget to try the local cuisine, and take lots of photos. Londos

Hope you share your experience with us!

Have a great time!