Dubai Travel

Dubai is the largest and most populous city in the United Arab Eubayy, iconic for its skyscrapers and high-rise buildings. In particular the Burj Khalifa – world’s tallest building.

Dubai is located on the Persian Gulf coast of the United Arab Emirates; and lies directly within the Arabian Desert.

Dubai has no rivers or oases; however Dubai does have a natural inlet, the Dubai Creek.

Even though Arabic is the official language of the United Arab Eubayy, English is the most spoken language in Dubai.

There are also other languages spoken in Dubai like Hindi, Urdu, Bengali, Tamil, Tagalog, Persian, Chinese, Malayalam, and others.

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a federation of seven constituent monarchies: the Emirates of Abu Dhabi, Ajman, Dubai, Fujairah, Ras al-Khaimah, Sharjah, and Umm al-Quwain.

The ruler of Dubai is the Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates, the head of government.

Tourism is an important part of the Dubai government’s strategy to maintain the flow of foreign cash into the emirate.

Dubai’s main tourist attraction is based mainly on shopping. Dubai has been called the “shopping capital of the Middle East”.

The City of Gold” – There are over 250 gold shops in Deira.

Dubai Creek Park plays a vital role in Dubai tourism.

Some of the most famous tourist attractions in Dubai are the Dolphinarium, Cable Car, Camel Ride, Horse Carriage and Exotic Birds Shows.

Palm Jumeirah Island

Dubai is home to several man-made islands, the Palm Jumeirah is an artificial archipelago.

It is one of three planned islands called the Palm Islands which extend into the Persian Gulf.

Palm Jumeirah has a monorail, that connects the Palm Jumeirah to the mainland, and has an extension to the Dubai Metro Rail.

Dubai Miracle Garden
The Dubai Miracle Garden, is the world’s largest flower garden. It has a total of 45 million flowers.

Dubai has a variety of parks like Safa Park, Mushrif Park, and Hamriya Park. Each park is different from the other; for example Mushrif Park showcases houses from different parts of the world.

Ski Dubai
Ski Dubai is a large indoor skiing facility at Mall of the Emirates, offering snowboarding, ski lessons, and has a children’s play area and a café.

Burj Al Arab Hotel
The Burj Al Arab Hotel / Tower of the Arabs Hotel , is a luxury hotel, is frequently described as “the world’s only 7-star” hotel on the hotel.

Public Transportation
Transport in Dubai is controlled by the Roads and Transport Authority – The RTA. The RTA is a government agency of Dubai, formed by royal decree in 2005. The bus system services 140 different routes.

Dubai Taxi Corporation, is a division of the RTA, they are known for their taxis with red roofs. There are also five private taxi companies.

Skyscraper Dubai
Dubai has a rich collection of buildings and structures of various architectural styles.

In 2010 they completed the Burj Khalifa – Khalifa Tower in english – the world’s tallest building.

At the top of the Burj Khalifa, you will find the world’s highest observatory deck with an outdoor terrace.

Dubai International Airport is the 3rd busiest airport in the world by passenger traffic. It handles an estimated 83 million passengers annually.

The airport is also the busiest airport in the world by international passenger traffic.

The Dubai Metro is the first urban train network in the Arabian Peninsula. All the trains run without a driver and are based on automatic navigation.

The tramway located in Al Sufouh, Dubai, runs for 14.5 kilometres that’s about 9.0 miles.

Arabic Food / Emirati Cuisine
Arabic food is very popular and tasty is available everywhere in the city. There are place in the tourist area that give free on the food laws and observations.

Dubai is known for its nightlife. Clubs and bars are found mostly in hotels due to the liquor laws.

Dress Code and the Law
The Emirati attire is typical of several countries in the Arabian peninsula.
Women usually wear the “Abaya”, a long black robe with a hijab – headscarf which also covers the neck.

The dress code is not mandatory nonetheless there are prohibitions on clothes that reveal too much skin.

Visitors are expected to conform to the dress code, and are encoded in Dubai’s criminal law.

Football and cricket are the most popular sports in Dubai.

The electrical current in Dubai is 220/240 V, 50 Hz AC. British-style 3-pin electrical plugs are used (Type G or 13 amp plug).

Most electrical goods sold in Dubai have European 2-pin plugs. The same power system is used throughout the United Arab Emirates.

There is no doubt traveling to Dubai is a must, discover the beauty of their islands. Take in the view from the highest of skyscrapers and gaze upon the beauty and charm of nature.

Let me know all about your experience in all those skyscrapers.

Take lots of pictures, and send us some. Have a good time.

Madrid Travel

Brief History of Madrid

Madrid is a great place to travel to,  it’s  history is full of interesting facts; here are a few of them.

Madrid is the capital of Spain since 1606. The development of Madrid as a city began when Philip II moved his court from Toledo to Madrid in 1560.

The origin of the name Madrid is believed to date back as far as 2nd century BC.

In 1329, Ferdinand IV of Castile assembled the Cortes Generales, a precursor to the modern Spanish parliament.

Between 1379 – 1406 Henry III of Castile rebuilt the city after it was destroyed by fire.

The marriage of Ferdinand and Isabella united the Crowns of Castile and Aragon, leading to the beginning of the Spain we all know and love today.

The two kingdoms maintained their national laws until 1714, when under the new Dynasty of the Bourboun a centralized State was built under the “Ways and Laws of Castile”.

The kingdoms of Castile and Aragón were fully united by Charles I of Spain.

During the 17th century, Madrid grew rapidly. The royal court attracted alot of artists and writers to Madrid among which are Cervantes and Lope de Vega.

Philip II transferred the capital from Toledo to Madrid in 1561.

In 1739 Philip V, began constructed new palaces, among which the Palacio Real de Madrid.

From 1716–1788 Charles III made Madrid a city full of buildings and monuments including the Prado and the Puerta de Alcalá.

In 1936–1939, Madrid was besieged by Spanish Nationalist and allied troops under Francisco Franco, during his dictatorship Madrid became very industrialized and experienced massive migrations from rural environments into the city.

Following the death of Franco, and in order to secure stability and democracy, the emerging democratic parties including those of left-wing and republican ideology accepted Franco’s wish to be succeeded by Juan Carlos I, leading to Spain’s current position as a constitutional monarchy.

Benefiting from prosperity in the 1980’s, Spain’s capital city has consolidated its position as the leading economic, cultural, industrial, educational and technological center of the Iberian peninsula.

The Monarchy of Spain referred to as the Crown or the Hispanic Monarchy comprises the reigning monarch, and of his or her family.

Spanish Constitution 

In 1978 the Spanish Constitution re-established the Spanish Monarchy as the form of government in Spain.

The present Spanish monarchy is represented by King Felipe VI, his wife Queen Letizia, and their daughters Leonor, Princess of Asturias, and Infanta Sofia.

It affirmed the role of the King of Spain as the personification and embodiment of the Spanish State and a symbol of Spain’s enduring unity and permanence.

In 2010, the budget for the Spanish monarchy was 7.4 million euros, one of the lowest public expenditures for the institution of monarchy in Europe.

Some of Madrid’s Most Popular Sites

Among Madrid’s most popular sites are the Museo Reina Sofia, Mercado de San Miguel, Temple de Debod, Plaza de Cibeles, Puerta del Sol, Gran Via, Retiro Park, Prado Museum, Plaza Mayor, and Palacio Real.

The Museo Reina Sofía was designed as a modern complement to the historical Prado Museum. The museum is home to a large collections of artwork by Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dalí.

The Mercado de San Miguel is a popular shopping destination for local foods and delicacies. On weekends it stays open as late as 2 a.m., as such it’s become a popular place to enjoy drinks and tapas.

The Temple of Debod is in Parque del Oeste, a park near the Royal Palace. The temple to the Egyptian goddess Isis; once stood on the banks of the Nile.

Plaza de Cibeles is closed to the Palace Cibeles, formerly known as the Palace of Communications. At the center of the plaza is a statue; the Fuente de la Cibeles. The fountain depicts the Roman goddess Cybele on a chariot drawn by lions.

Puerta del Sol, or the “Gate of the Sun,” is located in the center of Madrid. This is the place where thousands gather each New Year’s Eve to welcome in the new year. The statue of the Bear and the Strawberry Tree standing on one side of Puerta del Sol – is considered a symbol of Madrid.

The Gran Vía is known as the Broadway of Madrid because it’s “the street that never sleeps.” The Gran Vía has hundreds of shops, restaurants and businesses.

The Parque del Buen Retiro or El Retiro, is a 350-acre garden, with fountains located at the edge of the city center. Retiro Park was a monastery in the 1500s.

The Museo del Prado is an 18th century structure designed by Juan de Villanueva, which houses artworks from Goya, El Greco, da Ribera and Velázquez.

Madrid’s Plaza Mayor dates back to 1619, was used once to host bullfights.

The Palacio Real of Madrid is known for it’s huge structure, it has more than 2,500 fully decorated rooms. Built in 1764, the palace served as the royal residence of Carlos III.

The last royals to reside there were Alfonso XIII and Victoria Eugenie in the early 1900’s.

Fifty (50) of the rooms are open to the public, including the throne room (Salón del Trono),”.

The ceiling of the throne room was painted by the Baroque artist Tiepolo.

The palace is still used for official government ceremonies.

The palace also has a fresco in the grand dining hall that depicts Christopher Columbus presenting gifts from the New World to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella.

Travel Pass

When traveling to Madrid The Travel Pass is a wonderful way to save money when using Madrid’s public transport systems, the ticket is valid for all of Madrid’s Metro and Bus services within the city, together with the local suburban trains and the inner-city light railway.

The pass is available for 1, 2, 3, 5 or 7 days, and can be purchased for Zones A or T. Most of our visitors will require a pass for Zone A only, which covers all locations within Madrid’s city center including the airport.

The ticket is delivered in a protective plastic holder and includes Metro, bus and train maps, together with landmarks and places of interest in Madrid. Instructions for use are also included.

The pass must be purchased for the number of days you will use it for. It will then be activated the first time it is used, and the expiry date printed on the back.

The pass is then valid until 5:00 am on the day after the expiry date, allowing you to use the late nocturnal transport services as well.

In Madrid you can also buy a Tourist Pass and save big on top tourist attractions, some include transport and tapas at some of the sites.

In Madrid, electric power comes through at 220 volts and at 50 Hertz. Check to see if you will need a adapter.

Have a good time in Madrid, let me know about your true travel experience …

Paris Travel

Paris is and always have been a great place to travel to,  it’s  history is full of interesting facts; here are a few of them:

Paris, capital of France

It’s 105 square kilometres which is about 41 square miles, it was founded in the 3rd century BC by a Celtic people called the Parisii, who gave the city it’s name.

In the 12th century, it was the largest city in the western world, a prosperous trading centre. It’s also the home of one of the oldest Universities in history; The University of Paris.

In the 17th century Paris became one of Europe’s major finance, commerce, fashion, science, and arts center, a position that still keeps today.

Paris is the banking and financial centre of France, houses the headquarters of 29 of the 31 French companies ranked in the 2015 Fortune Global 500.

The city is also a major rail, highway, and air-transport hub, serves two international airports Paris-Charles de Gaulle which is the second busiest airport in Europe after London Heathrow Airport, and Paris-Orly.

The Paris Metro opened in 1900, serves 5.23 million passengers daily. It’s the second busiest metro system in Europe after Moscow Metro.

The central area of the city along the Seine River is classified as a UNESCO Heritage Site, and includes many notable monuments, including Notre Dame Cathedral (12th – 13th century); the Sainte-Chapelle (13th century); the Eiffel Tower (1889); the Grand Palais and Petit Palais (1900); and the Basilica of Sacré-Cœur in Montmartre (1914).

Paris is also known for its fashion, particularly the twice-yearly Paris Fashion Week, which includes Haute Couture, Paris Fashion Week for Men, and Paris Sping and Summer Collections.

Paris has alot of restaurants that are three stars or better, known for it’s fine food.


Most of France’s major universities and grandes écoles are located in Paris.

Le Monde, Le Figaro, and Libération are France’s major newspapers.


The association football club Paris Saint-Germain and the rugby union club Stade Français are also based in Paris.

If you are a sports fan you will like to visit the 80,000 seat Stade de France, which was constructed for the 1998 FIFA World Cup. It is located just north of Paris in the commune of Saint Denis.

Paris was also the hosts the annual French Open Grand Slam tennis tournament on the red clay of Roland Garros.

Paris hosted the 1900 and 1924 Summer Olympics – and is bidding to host the 2024 Summer Olympics.

The 1938 and 1998 FIFA World Cups, the 2007 Rugby World Cup and UEFA Euro 2016 were all held in the city, and every July the cycling Tour de France finishes there.

The Louvre Museum has some 35,000 artworks. View the paintings, sculpture and architecture from 450 BC to the 19th century.

Among the most popular is Venus de Milo and the Mona Lisa.

The museum has an English-speaking tour guide, with audio headsets, great for those who like to stand behind the crowd.

Enjoy a walking tour of the Palais Garnier, Paris’ premier opera house, it’s one of largest opera houses in Europe.

The Opera Garnier, as it is often called, inspired the setting for the famous musical, ‘Phantom of the Opera.’

There you will see the Grand Foyer, the main staircase (Grand Escalier in French).

The Neo-Baroque décor of this beautiful palace was designed by French architect Charles Garnier in the late 19th century. A guided tour usually takes an hour and a half to complete.

One of the unique things of France is that it offers you the opportunity to take to the skies in a hot air balloon ride, over Fontainebleau.

One of the highlights is watching the balloon inflation process, then taking a flight over the Fontainbleau countryside.

This was a former hunting ground of French royalty.

Once above you can view the whole town, the castle, and the wildlife of the forest.

When you land, you get to enjoy a glass of Champagne for the traditional toast des aéronautes, and then return by vehicle to the starting point.


Montmartre is the hilly part of Paris, decorated by a staircase that leads to the famous Sacré Coeur Cathedral.

There is another church on the hill, the older Saint Pierre de Montmartre, which is the founding place of the Jesuits.

The area is also famous for its nightlife and artists. The Moulin Rouge the cabaret that invented the can-can, a feisty French dance that put Montmartre on the map.

During sometime in their life artists such as Picasso, Van Gogh, Monet, Modigliani, Renoir and Dali all lived and or worked for some time in the area.

The Dali Espace museum is also worth a visit. Then make your way into a different kind of Paris as you stroll along quiet country streets that will make you forget you’re in a major European capital!

Air France

At the highest natural point you can appreciate two stunning views: the magnificent Sacré Coeur basilica on one side, and a panorama of Paris on the other.

If you are about to travel to Paris, do not forget to pack the right adapters for your small appliances. Otherwise, you will get yourself into trouble.

Electricity in France—and more generally in Europe—comes out of the electrical outlets at 230-240 volts. In the US, the voltage is 110 volts.

The Paris train, metro, RER, tram and bus system uses a smart card called Passe Navigo Découverte for week passes.

These passes are open to visitors as opposed to normal Navigo passes which are for residents of Ile-de-France only.
The services included are any metro, RER (suburban) train, buses (RATP/Noctilien/Optile), and trams up to the zone limits of your pass.

You can buy a Navigo Découverte pass at nearly any Metro, RER, Transilien train ticket window that normally sells tickets and passes.

Have a good time in Paris, take lots of pictures and share some with us, bon voyage!